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Copyright and Fair Use : Your Copyright

Learn about copyright and fair use.

Alexa Hight - Scholarly Communication Librarian

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Alexa Hight
She/Her/Hers
Contact:
361-825-2588
alexa.hight@tamucc.edu
Bell Library, Room 115

Who Owns the Copyright

  • The creator of a new work is the copyright owner
  • Two or more authors working together may be joint copyright owners
  • The copyright owner of a work made for hire is the employer
  • Copyrights may be transferred by means of a written document signed by the copyright owner (such as a book or article publishing contract)
  • Institutional policies are important for clarifying or sharing rights to new works, but they must conform to legal requirements

Copyright and Publishing

Getting published is quite the accomplishment. It takes hard work to write something worth publishing, and getting something published is hard work itself. Often authors are too excited and relieved to read the fine print of whatever agreement the publisher sends them. However, knowing what you are signing is important in exercising your rights as the copyright holder. You may be asked to relinquish all copyright. Authors who are faced with a publication contract that seeks transfer of the copyright should not hesitate to negotiate new terms or at least to reserve rights to use their own work in future teaching and writing and publish their work in a repository or find a different publisher. There are resources that can help in making decisions about their copyrights. 

Resources: 

  • The Authors Alliance: Promotes authorship for the "public good by supporting authors who write to be read." 
  • Author Rights & the SPARC Author Addendum: SPARC promotes authors' rights and open access. SPARC's author addendum allow authors retain open access rights in their author agreement. 
  • Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine: Creative Commons offers this addendum engine to assist authors in creating addenda to be included with publication agreements. These documents amend the publication agreement to allow authors to retain rights to use and share their work. 
  • SHERPA/RoMEO: This project offers important insight into the language of publication agreements. 

SPARC defines Open Access: 

Open Access is the free, immediate, online availability of research articles combined with the rights to use these articles fully in the digital environment. 

This can include journals, books, databases, etc. Traditional academic publishing makes accessing journal articles and books expensive and rather difficult to access. Authors who publish open access use their copyright to more equitable access to information for everyone around the world.

For authors publishing their work, publishing open access may mean that their work is deposited in an open access repository, or that they are publishing in a journal that offers open access to all of their articles, or to those articles where an author negotiates for their work to be open access. Learn more about Open Access

Creative Commons

Creative Commons Licenses

License  Symbols Type of Use You Can

Attribution

(BY)

Related image Commercial and non-commercial
  • Copy
  • Adapt or modify
  • Redistribute (publish, display, publicly perform or communicate the work)
  • License to others

Attribution - Noncommercial

(By-NC)

Image result for by-nc Non-commercial only
  • Copy
  • Adapt or modify
  • Redistribute (publish, display, publicly perform or communicate the work)
  • License to others

Attribution - Share Alike

(BY-SA)

Image result for by-sa Commercial and non-commercial
  • Copy
  • Adapt or modify
  • Redistribute (publish, display, publicly perform or communicate the work)
  • License to others on the same terms as the original work

Attribution - No Derivative Works

(BY-ND)

Image result for by-nd Commercial and non-commercial
  • Copy
  • Redistribute (publish, display, publicly perform or communicate the work)
  • License to others

Attribution - Noncommercial - Share Alike

(BY-NC-SA)

Image result for cc license images Non-commercial only
  • Copy
  • Adapt or modify
  • Redistribute (publish, display, publicly perform or communicate the work)
  • License to others

Attribution - Noncommercial - No Derivative Works

(BY-NC-ND)

Image result for by-nc-nd Non-commercial only
  • Copy
  • Redistribute (publish, display, publicly perform or communicate the work)
  • License to others

Table derived from:https://www.smartcopying.edu.au/information-sheets/tafe/students-and-copyright/students-and-copyright/students-and-copyright Creative Commons License

Attribution

This guide was created using many resources, many of them are linked throughout the guide. This guide was also built using information from: Crews, K. D. (2012). Copyright law for librarians and educators. Chicago: American Library Association.